Ring

1

A unit of count, at least as early as the 17ᵗʰ – 19ᵗʰ century, throughout Germany, Denmark, Sweden and England = 240. chart symbol

In some areas, it also became a unit of volume for certain commodities, such as charcoal and peat.

sources

1

Clapholt or Clapboord

the small hundred cont. 6 score boords...........................xv s.
the Ring cont. two small hundred................................j li. x s.
the great hundred conteyning. xxiiij small hundred......xviij li.

“A Subsidy granted to the King of Tonnage and Poundage and other summes of Money payable upon Merchandize Exported and Imported.”
A statute from the 12th year of Charles II, 1660. The selection is from the Rates of Merchandizes, which is not part of the statute proper but developed from it. Both are printed in:
Statutes of the Realm, Volume 5: 1628-80, John Raithby, editor.
London: 1819. Page 186.

2

Indessen gibt es doch im Deutschen Fälle, wo dieses Wort noch von einer gewissen Bestimmten Masse oder Zahl gebraucht wird, welche nebst der Etymologies an dieser Bedeutung nicht zweifeln lassen. So ist in Sachsen ein Ring Kohlen so viel Kohlen, als aus zehen Klaftern 7/4 langes Holz gebrannt werden können. In den Niedersächsischen Marschländern ist ein Ring Torf eine Menge Torf von 8 bis 9000 Stücken; ingleichen ein Stück Landes , welches so vielen Torf gibt. Im Bremischen hingegen ist ein Ringel Torf ein Haufe von 8 Sohden. In dem Holzhandel wird auch das Stabholz nach Ringen verkauft, und da hält ein Ring gemeiniglich vier Schock 240 Stück. Allein in andern Gegenden, z. B. in Obersachsen, sind die Ringe nach Verschiedenheit des Stabholzes verschieden; denn ob sie gleich alle 120 Würfe halten, so rechnet man doch bei den Pipenstäben zwei Stück, bei den Orhoft-Stäben drei Stück, und bei dem Tonnenstäben vier Stück auf Einen Wurf, da man denn auf jeden 30sten Wurf, noch Einen darein zu geben pflegt. Fünf Ringe machen in Hamburg ein großes Tausend oder 1200 Stück. An einigen Orten pflegt man auch andere Dinge nach Ringen zu zahlen, und alsdann hält ein Ring allemahl 4 Schock oder 240 Stück.

There are, however, cases in German where this word is still used for a certain definite mass or number which, along with the etymologies, do not leave any doubt about this meaning. In Saxony, for example, a Ring of charcoal is as much charcoal as could be made by burning ten Klaftern of wood 7 × 7 × 4 Fuss long.† In the Lower Saxony marshland, a Ring of peat is a quantity of eight to nine thousand pieces of peat; at the same time a piece of land that yields that much peat. In Bremen, on the other hand, a Ring of peat is a pile of 8 Sohden.‡ In the timber trade, staves are also sold by Rings, and a Ring usually holds four Schock, [4 × 60 =] 240 pieces. Only in other areas, e.g. in Upper Saxony, the Ring are different according to the difference of the staves; for even though they all hold 120 Würfe, one reckons with the pipe staves two pieces, with the oxhoft staves three pieces, and with the Tonnen staves four pieces to one Wurf, since one has to give one more on every 30th Würfe. Five Rings make a großes Tausend or 1200 pieces in Hamburg. In some places it is customary to pay for other things by Rings, and then a Ring will hold 4 Schock or 240 pieces.

Johann Christoph Adelung.
Grammatisch-kritisches Wörterbuch der Hochdeutschen Mundart… 2nd ed.
Dritter Theil, von M — Scr.
Leipzig: bei Breitkopf und Härkel, 1798.
Column 1120.
† This decoding of the Klafter notation is a wild surmise on our part. Reader, if you are well-informed about the German charcoal trade in the 18ᵗʰ century, please enlighten us.
‡ We do not know what a Solden is. Perhaps it refers to layers that have a standardized thickness. Again, we beg a reader familiar with German turf-cutting in the 18ᵗʰ century to explain this measure to us.

3

Ring, Zählm. für Klapp-, Stab- und Faßholz — 240 Stück (in Danzig für Klappholz = 2 kleine Hundert zu 2 Schock, in Hamburg = 240 Stäbe, in Livland für Stab- u. Faßholz = 1/5 Großtausend = 2 Großhundert); vgl. Grosstausend.

Jansen (1900), page xxx.

2

In parts of England, a unit of dry capacity = ½ quarter.

sources

The ring is common in the Huntingdonshire accounts of Ramsey Abbey. It was equal to half a quarter, i.e. is identical with the coomb of the eastern counties.

James E. Thorold Rogers.
A History of Agriculture and Prices in England. Vol. 1.
Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1882.
Page 168.

3

In Denmark, a unit of count for planks, = 10.

X

Sorry. No information on contributors is available for this page.

home | units index | search |  contact drawing of envelope |  contributors | 
help | privacy | terms of use