pose [French]

1

In the bilingual Swiss canton of Vaud (German: Waadt), a unit of land area. Prior to 1822 = 40,000 pieds carrées = 3440 square meters.¹

A law of 27 May 1822, effective 1 January 1823, metrified the canton's units, making the pied of Vaud (German: waadttändische Fuss) exactly 300 millimeters. This change rippled through the canton's units of land area, making the pose 4500 square meters.

     

pose or Juchart

   

fossorier

10

toise carrée or Quadrat-Klafter

50

500

pied carrée or Quadrat-Fuss

100

5000

50,000

.09
sq. m

9
sq. m

450
sq. m

4500
sq. m

In 1848 the Jukart was defined as = 400 square Ruthen. The Ruthe was made the same as the Vaud toise, 3 meters, making the new Swiss Jukart 9 sq. meters times 400 = 3600 sq. m. Conveniently, the pose of Vaud was thus exactly 1.25 Swiss Jucharts

It was also equal to the Morgen of the German principality of Baden. In their 1822 law Vaud was following the example of Baden, which by a metrication law of 10 November 1810 (really effective 1831) set their Fuss at 0.3 meters, making their Morgen 3600 square meters.³

1. Doursther, page 437.

2. Noback, vol 1, page 463.

3. Noback, vol 1, page 405, vide Karlsruhe.

2

In Geneva, there were two poses. The one also called a journal = 8 ouvrées or fossoyées = 400 square toise, each toise = 8 pieds de roi, = 2701.33 square meters.¹

The one also called a setine = 500 square toises =3376.66 square meters.¹

1. Doursther, page 437.

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