Cambodia
units of mass

19th century and earlier

             

mo hap mo chong

           

hap or picul

           

chong

2

3

         

hien

5

10

15

       

néal

10

50

100

150

 

tael or tomlong

16

160

800

1,600

2,400

   

chi

10

160

1600

8,000

16,000

24,000

 

hun

10

100

1600

16,000

80,000

160,000

240,000

Lemire (1869)

390
mg

3.90
9

39.05
g

624.8
g

6.248
kg

31.24
kg

62.48
kg

93.72
kg

Moura (1878)

375
mg

3.75
g

37.5
g

600
g


 


 

*
 


 

Nicolas (1900)


 


 


 


 


 


 

60.400
kg


 

* Among the larger weights, Moura relates only the pikul to the néal, but he distinguishes three kinds of pikuls or hap:

Which raises the question of what a ligature was, which Lemire explains.

La sapèque annamite est un disque de zinc, percé à son centre d'un trou carré et portant sur l'une des faces le chiffre du règne sous lequel il a été fondu. 600 de ces disques enfilés ensemble forment une ligature (quan tien) ou chapelet valant 1 franc. Chaque ligature se divise en 10 liens de 60 sapèques chaque. On appelle gueuse de sapèques l'assemblage de 10 ligatures.

Pages 175 and 176.

Une ligature de sapèques = 10 tien= 600 sapèques = 1 franc environ. Elle pèse 1 kilogramme et demi.

Pages 219 and 220.

The Annamite sapeck is a disc of zinc, pierced at its center with a square hole and bearing on one side the symbol of the reign in which it was minted. 600 of these discs are threaded together to make a ligature (quan tien) or rosary worth 1 franc. Each ligature is divided into 10 links of 60 sapecks each. An assembly of ten ligatures is called a pig of sapecks.

A ligature of sapecks = 10 tien = 600 sapecks = about 1 franc. It weighs a kilogram and a half.

Lemire (cited below)

Taking the ligature as 1.5 kg would make Moura's piculs 60, 63 and 67.5 kg respectively, which fits.

Moura's values are significantly lighter than the other authors'.

Moura details a second set of weights which he describes as “poids purement cambodgien. … Ces poids servent également, et concurremment avec les précédents, dans le commerce de détail." [purely Cambodian weights. … These weights serve equally and concurrently with the preceding ones, in retail trade.]

     

tael or damleng

     

bat

4

   

slong

4

16

fuong

2

8

32

pey

4

8

32

1024

293
mg

1.172
mg

2.344
mg

9.375
g

37.5
g

This system is a version of Siamese coin weights, each name serving both as the name of the coin and of a unit of mass.

M. Moura.
Vocabulaire Français-Cambodgien et Cambodgien-Français.
Paris: Challamel Ainé, Libraire-Éditeur, 1878.

Pages 20, 21.

Charles Lemire.
Cochinchine Française et Royaume de Cambodge.
Paris: Challamel Ainé, Libraire-Éditeur, 1869.

Page 468.

Pierre Nicolas.
Notices sur l'Indo-Chine, Cochinchine, Cambodge, Annam, Tonkin, Laos, Kouang-Tchéou-Ouan / publiées à l'occasion de l'Exposition Universelle de 1900.
[Paris: 1900]

Page 166.

20th century

           

hap or picul

         

chong

2

       

néal

50

100

tael or damleng

16

800

1600

   

chi

10

160

8000

16,000

 

hun

10

100

1600

80,000

160,000

lin or li

10

100

1000

16,000

800,000

1,600,000

37.5
mg

375
mg

3.75
g

37.5
g

600
g

30
kg

60
kg

United Nations, 1955.

21st century

The damleng and chi are reported to be in use in goldsmiths' shops, with the chi at 37.14 grams.

Angorlad. Buying Gold in Cambodia. www.tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g293939-i9162-k4958881-Gold_Buying_Gold_in_Cambodia-Cambodia.html  Accessed 22 Oct 2014.

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